Postdoc position at the University of Utah

The Second Language Teaching and Research Center (L2TReC: http://l2trec.utah.edu) at the University of Utah invites applications for 1-year full-time post-doctoral position in Corpus Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition. L2TReC is a vibrant hub for faculty and students with research interests in Second Language Acquisition and L2 pedagogy. It coordinates research based on data generated by the State of Utah’s ambitious Dual Language Immersion Program (http://www.utahdli.org), directs a large-scale project to collect and analyze proficiency data on L2 learners of several languages at the college level, delivers intensive language courses to military personnel, provides support and training for L2 instructors at all levels, and administers the high school portion of Utah’s Dual Immersion Program (http://l2trec.utah.edu/bridge-program/index.php).

We are seeking a post-doctoral fellow with a background in corpus linguistics, preferably with hands-on experience in corpus building. The successful applicant will be expected to oversee continued development of the Center’s Multilingual Corpus of Second Language Speech. A pilot version of the corpus has been built, consisting of spoken samples from 3rd grade DLI students in Chinese, French and Spanish. Samples have been transcribed and tagged according to CHILDES protocols. There is no expectation that applicants will have had prior experience working with CHILDES, but the successful candidate is expected to gain the requisite expertise upon joining our team. It will be the responsibility of the successful applicant to assess efficacy of the corpus design and functionality to date, propose and implement any desirable changes, and then lead further additions to the corpus. This will require training and supervising a cadre of student research assistants in the corpus languages (Chinese, French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish). The ideal candidate will have native or near-native proficiency in one of the corpus languages as well as English. Applicant must be self-motivated, resourceful, very organized, able to multi-task and prioritize and possess strong quantitative and analytic skills. Strong writing ability is required as applicant will be expected to contribute to grant writing efforts in support of corpus development.

Required Qualifications:

PhD in related field.

Sound knowledge of corpus linguistics (annotation, corpus queries) and quantitative analysis of corpus data.

Ability to acquire new technical and/or theoretical knowledge as needed.

Native or near-native proficiency in spoken and written English and a high level of proficiency in one of the corpus languages (Chinese, French, German, Portuguese, Russian and Spanish).

Ability to coordinate day-to-day business with the PIs to ensure that project goals and deadlines are met.

Excellent communication skills and the ability to work well in a team.

Desirable qualifications:

Sufficient structural knowledge to perform analytical and corpus-based work in one or more additional languages in the corpus.

Desired starting date November 1, 2017 (flexible). Salary is commensurate with experience and qualifications.

Please apply online at http://utah.peopleadmin.com/postings/69035

Review of applications begins on October 15, 2017 and will continue until the position is filled. Applicants should provide a cover letter, CV, and a writing sample. Applicants should identify three references on their CV who may be contacted to provide letters of recommendation.

Application Deadline: (Open until filled)

If you have questions about this position, please contact Dr. Jane F. Hacking: j.hacking@utah.edu.

The University of Utah is an Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity employer and is committed to diversity in its workforce. In compliance with applicable federal and state laws, University of Utah policy of equal employment opportunity prohibits discrimination on the basis of race or ethnicity, religion, color, national origin, sex, age, sexual orientation, gender identity/expression, veteran’s status, status as a qualified person with a disability, or genetic information. Individuals from historically underrepresented groups, such as minorities, women, qualified persons with disabilities, and protected veterans are strongly encouraged to apply. Veterans’ preference is extended to qualified applicants, upon request and consistent with University policy and Utah state law.

To inquire about this posting, email: employment@utah.edu or call 801-581-2300. Reasonable accommodations in the application process will be provided to qualified individuals with disabilities. To request an accommodation or for further information about University AA/EO policies, please contact the Office of Equal Opportunity and Affirmative Action, 201 S. Presidents Cr., Rm 135, (801) 581-8365 (V/TDD), email: oeo@umail.utah.edu.

This position may require the successful completion of a criminal background check and/or drug screen.

 

PhD fellowship in Corpus Linguistics available, focusing on the application of corpora in the teaching of English. Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences – Hamar

Inland Norway University of Applied Sciences – Hamar is currently looking to recruit a PhD research fellow in Corpus Linguistics (three years), focusing on the application of corpora in the teaching of English. The application deadline is 01 September 2017.

Details are found here: https://www.jobbnorge.no/en/available-jobs/job/140082/research-fellow-in-corpus-linguistics-focusing-on-the-application-of-corpora-in-the-teaching-of-english

PhD fellowship in Linguistics and Second Language Acquisition at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) and the Université Catholique de Louvain (UC Louvain) – new application deadline

The Center for Linguistics (CLIN) of the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (VUB) has an opening  for a PhD fellowship for a total period of four years, starting September – November 2017.

The position is part of the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO)-funded research project entitled Lexicogrammatical complexity: a missing construct in L2 research. The project is supervised by Alex Housen (VUB), with Magali Paquot (UCLouvain) as cosupervisor.

The project is concerned with the complexity and learning difficulties that arise at the lexicon-grammar interface in the process of second language acquisition, with a focus on Dutch as a second/foreign language.

Job description:
The research project is a joint venture between the Center of Linguistics at the VUB and
the Centre for English Corpus Linguistics (CECL) at the UCLouvain. The candidate will
be affiliated to the Center of Linguistics (CLIN) at the VUB and the Centre for English
Corpus Linguistics (CECL) at the UCLouvain, and will prepare a joint VUB-UCLouvain
PhD in Linguistics.

Activities that the candidate will perform include:

  • develop and implement (i) theoretical concepts in line with the focus of the research project and (ii) appropriate methodological procedures for investigating these concepts;
  • conduct corpus-based analyses of L1 and L2 Dutch writing samples;
  • interpret the results of the analyses and report on the project in conference
    presentations and academic publications;
  • by the end of the four-year term, submit and defend a PhD dissertation based on the project.

Requirements and profile:
- Master degree in Linguistics, Applied Linguistics, Language & Literature, Natural
Language Processing or in Language Learning and Teaching, with a master thesis on
a topic relevant to the project;
- excellent record of BA and MA level study;
- excellent command of Dutch, very good command of English. Knowledge of French
is an asset;
- excellent and demonstrated analytical skills;
- ability to work with common software packages (including MS Word, Excel and
PowerPoint);
- knowledge of inferential statistics and statistical software (e.g. SPSS, R) is an asset;
- basic knowledge of corpus-linguistic techniques is a requirement;
- programming skills in Perl or Python are also an asset;
- excellent and demonstrated self-management skills, ability and willingness to work in
a team;
- willingness to live in or near Brussels and to travel abroad (for short-term research
stays and to attend international academic conferences).

Terms of employment:
- the contract will initially be for one year, three times renewable, with a total of four
years;
- the candidate receives a doctoral fellowship grant (starting at approx. EUR 1900 net
per month) and full medical insurance;
- the position requires residence in Belgium, preferably in or near Brussels;
- applicants from outside the EU are responsible for obtaining the necessary visa or
permits, with the assistance of the International Office of the VUB.
Application Deadline: 31 August 2017
Please include with your application:
- a cover letter in English, in which you specify why you are interested in this position
and how you meet the job requirements outlined above;
- a curriculum vitae in English;
- a concise academic statement in Dutch, in which you outline your plans for graduate
study and career goals;
- a copy of BA and MA diplomas and degrees;
- a copy of your master thesis and academic publications (if applicable);
- the names and contact details of two academic referees.

Shortlisted candidates will be invited for an interview (in situ or via video conferencing) in
August and/or September 2017.

Applications (as an email attachment) and inquiries should be addressed to:
Prof. dr. Alex Housen                                                        Dr. Magali Paquot
Dept. of Linguistics and Literary Studies (LIST)         Centre for English Corpus Linguistics
Vrije Universiteit Brussel                                                  Université Catholique de Louvain
Pleinlaan 2                                                                           Place Blaise Pascal 1, bte L3.03.31
B-1050 Brussels, Belgium                                                 B-1348 Louvain-la-Neuve, Belgium
Email: alex.housen@vub.be                                             Email: magali.paquot@uclouvain.be

The IRIS Replication Award

£300 will be awarded annually to a published (or accepted) self-labelled replication* using materials held on IRIS.

Submissions must include:

i) the article/chapter (with evidence of ‘in press’ status if not already published);
ii) the materials from IRIS and any adaptations of them (adaptations should also be uploaded to IRIS, with a Note to link it to the earlier study’s materials).
IRIS now accepts data of all kinds, and we encourage applicants to submit their raw data along with their other materials.

Review Process
Submissions can be made to iris@iris-database.org at any time. The first round will close 30th November 2018. The study must have been published (or in press) from 2016 onwards. All submissions will be reviewed by the IRIS directors and up to two anonymous reviewers. The first award will be announced by 1 January 2019.

Criteria for award
Submissions will be welcome from any area of second language research (broadly defined, including multilingualism, language education, research methodology). All methodological approaches and theoretical perspectives are welcome.

Submissions will be reviewed against the following criteria:

  • Strength of the justification for the replication.
  • Soundness and transparency of methods and analysis, including clarity about how these are similar/different to those of the initial study.
  • How well the discussion and conclusions are warranted by the methods, data and analysis.
  • How well the findings from the initial study are integrated into the set-up, analysis and interpretation of the replication.

Special consideration will be given to:

  • Multi-site replications
  • Open data
  • Pre-registered studies
  • Direct or partial replications (though we emphasize that conceptual replications, which change more than one significant variable, are also welcome)

Replications using materials developed by IRIS Directors are not eligible.

https://www.iris-database.org/iris/app/home/replication_award

Please direct any questions to iris@irisdatabase.org.
*The study is labeled as a replication in the title and/or abstract.

PAC 2017 / Phonology and interphonology of contemporary English: from native corpora to learner corpora

CALL FOR PAPERS

International conference
Thursday, September 28th to Saturday, September 30th 2017
@ Université Paris Nanterre

Organised by
Centre de Recherches Anglophones, EA 370
Université Paris 8
Université Paris Lumières

Guest Speakers
Jacques Durand, Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès
Dan Frost, Université de Grenoble
Patrick Honeybone, University of
Edinburgh

All papers focusing on the main theme summarized by the title of the
conference are welcome but, to contextualize this forthcoming event,
participants should be aware that PAC 2017 is a logical extension of the
conferences that the PAC project has organized annually since 2000, on a
European level, at the universities of Toulouse II, Montpellier III and
Aix-Marseille I, and reflects the developing activities of this project.
All contributions on the phonology and phonetics of contemporary English
as well as on the interphonology of English are welcome.

GENERAL PAC SESSION

The general PAC session will be dedicated to the following theme:
“Usage-based accounts and phonological models: how to articulate
phonetic-acoustic studies and phonological theory?” In recent years,
usage-based accounts, especially within the framework of Exemplar Theory
(Pierrehumbert 2001, 2006), have been put forward as relevant
explanations for various phenomena observed, on the basis of oral
corpora, in the different varieties of oral English. By relying on
frequency effects, such accounts have shed light on the emergence and
evolution of New Zealand and Australian English (Trudgill 2004, Gordon
et al. 2004) or on the dynamics of rhoticity and r-sandhi phenomena in
contemporary non-rhotic varieties (Cox et al. 2014) for example.
However, such accounts are often criticised for lacking phonological
abstraction and for not being able to fully account for the phenomena in
question as they do not model their underlying mechanisms at the
phonological level. That is why many phonologists have rejected these
accounts. However, other phonologists have shown how the results
provided by phonetic-acoustic studies and usage-based accounts of
corpora can lend themselves to theoretical analyses and help model the
emergence and evolution of phenomena at the phonological level (see
Patrick Honeybone’s work on T-to-R in Liverpool English (to appear) for
an example of such an approach).

INTERPHONOLOGY SESSION

The interphonology session will be dedicated to the following theme:
“Variation, correctness and correction”. We encourage participants to
investigate the phonetic and phonological systems developed by
non-native speakers/learners of English who have command of English
either as a foreign language (EFL) or a second language (ESL) in various
parts of the world and in different contexts of communication.
Interphonology will be discussed both as a theoretical, linguistic
construct and empirically by looking into aspects of the learners’ new
phonological system, while in the process of establishing itself or when
it has already been stabilised and/or regularised. Inter-speaker and
intra-speaker variation will also be central to our study of
interphonology to understand, for instance, how segmental variability is
integrated in the newly developed phonological system and how the
phonologies of two (or more) languages at work mutually influence each
other. “Correction” can be envisaged as a didactic tool for improving
students’ oral performances. It can also be rejected on theoretical
grounds. It can be tackled as the adaptation process, or modification
process, put in place by students when trying to reach specific
phonological or phonetic targets. “Correctness” can constitute a goal as
far as communication and interaction in English are concerned for
learners. It can also be questioned as a pedagogical goal, for instance
with the prevalence of RP as a target accent in the French academic
context. The problem of conciliating variation and correction in the
study / teaching of English as a foreign or second language can lend
itself to relevant reflections here.

********************
Submission of papers

Abstracts should be no longer than one side of A4, with 2.5 cm margins,
single-spaced, with a font size no smaller than 12, and with normal
character spacing. All examples and references in the abstract should be
included on the one single page, but it is enough, when referring to
previous work, to cite “Author (Date)” in the body of the abstract – you
do not need to include the full reference. Please send two copies of
your abstract – one of these should be anonymous and one should include
your name, affiliation and email at the top of the page, directly below
the title. All abstracts will be reviewed anonymously by members of the
scientific committee or other experts in the field. The named file
should be camera-ready, as it will be used in the abstracts booklet if
the proposal is accepted. Abstracts should be submitted in the same
form, in a PDF file, by email to cecile.viollain@u-paris10.fr with copy
to sylvain.navarro@univ-paris-diderot.fr and
nadine.herry@univ-paris8.fr.

Time for papers: 30 minutes, plus 15 minutes for questions.

Dates and deadlines

Conference: September 28th / September 30th 2017
Final deadline for submissions: March 31st 2017
Results of refereeing of abstracts: Friday June 30th 2017


Anne Przewozny-Desriaux
MCF HDR – English Phonology
Dpt des Etudes du Monde Anglophone
CLLE-ERSS | CNRS UMR 5263
Université Toulouse 2 Jean Jaurès
5 allées Antonio Machado
31058 TOULOUSE Cedex 9 France
+ 33 5 61 50 36 04

http://clle.univ-tlse2.fr/accueil/actualites/annuaire/mme-przewozny-desriaux-anne-

29321.kjsp?RH=1458287939123

PAC 2017 at http://www.projet-pac.net/index.php/news
PAC programme at http://www.projet-pac.net/
LVTI project at http://www.projet-pac.net/index.php/frfr

Spanish Learner Corpus Research: Current trends and future perspectives

Edited by Margarita Alonso-Ramos
Universidade da Coruña

Just published!

The aim of this book is to present a comprehensive picture of the current state of Spanish learner corpus research (SLCR), which makes it unique, since no other monograph has focused on collecting research dealing with learner corpora of any language other than English. In addition to an introductory appraisal of current SLCR, as well as a wake-up call reminding us that learner corpus design still needs to be improved, this volume features a selection of original studies ranging from general issues concerning learner corpora compilation to more specific aspects such as phonetic, lexical, grammatical and pragmatic features of the interlanguage of learners of Spanish, as reflected in corpus data. This volume will undoubtedly be of significant interest to researchers involved in corpus linguistics, second language acquisition research, as well as to professionals in the field of Spanish as a second language, including teachers, and creators and publishers of teaching materials.

Check Spanish Learner Corpus Research: Current trends and future perspectives

PAC 2017 – Phonology and interphonology of contemporary English: from native corpora to learner corpora

CALL FOR PAPERS

International conference
Thursday, September 28th to Saturday, September 30th 2017
@ Université Paris Nanterre / Paris Nanterre University

Guest Speakers
Jacques Durand, Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès
Dan Frost, Université de Grenoble
Patrick Honeybone, University of Edinburgh

All papers focusing on the main theme summarized by the title of the
conference are welcome but, to contextualize this forthcoming event,
participants should be aware that PAC 2017 is a logical extension of
the conferences that the PAC project has organized annually since
2000, on a European level, at the universities of Toulouse II,
Montpellier III and Aix-Marseille I, and reflects the developing
activities of this project.
All contributions on the phonology and phonetics of contemporary
English as well as on the interphonology of English are welcome.

GENERAL PAC SESSION

The general PAC session will be dedicated to the following theme:
?Usage-based accounts and phonological models: how to articulate
phonetic-acoustic studies and phonological theory??.

In recent years, usage-based accounts, especially within the framework
of Exemplar Theory (Pierrehumbert 2001, 2006), have been put forward
as relevant explanations for various phenomena observed, on the basis
of oral corpora, in the different varieties of oral English. By
relying on frequency effects, such accounts have shed light on the
emergence and evolution of New Zealand and Australian English
(Trudgill 2004, Gordon et al. 2004) or on the dynamics of rhoticity
and r-sandhi phenomena in contemporary non-rhotic varieties (Cox et
al. 2014) for example. However, such accounts are often criticised for
lacking phonological abstraction and for not being able to fully
account for the phenomena in question as they do not model their
underlying mechanisms at the phonological level. That is why many
phonologists have rejected these accounts. However, other phonologists
have shown how the results provided by phonetic-acoustic studies and
usage-based accounts of corpora can lend themselves to theoretical
analyses and help model the emergence and evolution of phenomena at
the phonological level (see Patrick Honeybone?s work on T-to-R in
Liverpool English (to appear) for an example of such an approach).

INTERPHONOLOGY SESSION

The interphonology session will be dedicated to the following theme:
?Variation, correctness and correction?. We encourage participants to
investigate the phonetic and phonological systems developed by
non-native speakers/learners of English who have command of English
either as a foreign language (EFL) or a second language (ESL) in
various parts of the world and in different contexts of communication.
Interphonology will be discussed both as a theoretical, linguistic
construct and empirically by looking into aspects of the learners? new
phonological system, while in the process of establishing itself or
when it has already been stabilised and/or regularised. Inter-speaker
and intra-speaker variation will also be central to our study of
interphonology to understand, for instance, how segmental variability
is integrated in the newly developed phonological system and how the
phonologies of two (or more) languages at work mutually influence each
other. ?Correction? can be envisaged as a didactic tool for improving
students? oral performances. It can also be rejected on theoretical
grounds. It can be tackled as the adaptation process, or modification
process, put in place by students when trying to reach specific
phonological or phonetic targets. ?Correctness? can constitute a goal
as far as communication and interaction in English are concerned for
learners. It can also be questioned as a pedagogical goal, for
instance with the prevalence of RP as a target accent in the French
academic context. The problem of conciliating variation and correction
in the study / teaching of English as a foreign or second language can
lend itself to relevant reflections here.

********************
Submission of papers

Abstracts should be no longer than one side of A4, with 2.5 cm
margins, single-spaced, with a font size no smaller than 12, and with
normal character spacing. All examples and references in the abstract
should be included on the one single page, but it is enough, when
referring to previous work, to cite “Author (Date)” in the body of the
abstract – you do not need to include the full reference. Please send
two copies of your abstract – one of these should be anonymous and one
should include your name, affiliation and email at the top of the
page, directly below the title. All abstracts will be reviewed
anonymously by members of the scientific committee or other experts in
the field. The named file should be camera-ready, as it will be used
in the abstracts booklet if the proposal is accepted.

Abstracts should be submitted in the same form, in a PDF file, by
email to cecile.viollain@u-paris10.fr with copy to
sylvain.navarro@univ-paris-diderot.fr and nadine.herry@univ-paris8.fr.

Time for papers: 30 minutes, plus 15 minutes for questions.

Dates and deadlines
Conference: September 28th / September 30th 2017 ?
Final deadline for submissions: March 31st 2017 ?
Results of refereeing of abstracts: Friday June 30th 2017

*****************
The PAC project (Phonologie de l?Anglais Contemporain: usages,
variétés et structure – The Phonology of Contemporary English: usage,
varieties and structure) is coordinated by Anne Przewozny-Desriaux
(Toulouse Jean Jaurès University), Sophie Herment (University of
Aix-Marseille), Sylvain Navarro (Paris Diderot University) and Cécile
Viollain (Paris Nanterre University).

The main aims of the project can be summarized as follows: to give a
better picture of spoken English in its unity and diversity
(geographical, social and stylistic); to test existing theoretical
models in phonology, phonetics and sociolinguistics from a synchronic
and diachronic point of view, making room for the systematic study of
variation; to favour communication between specialists in speech and
in phonological theory; to provide corpus-based data and analyses
which will help improve the teaching of English as a foreign language.

To achieve these goals, the cornerstone of the PAC project is the
creation of a large database on contemporary oral English, coming from
a wide variety of linguistic areas in the English-speaking world (such
as Great Britain: Received Pronunciation, Lancashire, York, Ayrshire,
Edinburgh, Glasgow, West Midlands: Birmingham, Black Country ;
Republic of Ireland: Limerick, Cork ; Canada: Alberta, Ontario ;
Australia: New South Wales ; New Zealand: Christchurch, Dunedin ;
India: Delhi English, Mumbai ; USA: California, West Texas, Saint
Louis, Boston, North Carolina). The protocol used is shared by all
researchers in every survey location and was inspired by the classical
methodology of William Labov.

Although significant corpora of oral English already exist, many of
them have been conceived along exclusively sociolinguistic rather than
explicitly phonological lines. In other cases, hardly any information
is available on speakers beyond gender and regional affiliation.
Furthermore, few corpora are based upon a single methodology
permitting a fully comparative analysis of the data.

The approach chosen by the PAC program is modelled on the French PFC
program (La Phonologie du Français Contemporain, coordinated by M.-H.
Côté (Ottawa University), J. Durand (Université Toulouse Jean Jaurès),
B. Laks (Université Paris Ouest Nanterre la Défense) and C. Lyche
(Oslo/Tromsø). This parent program has demonstrated how a corpus which
was originally conceived for phonology can lend itself to many other
types of linguistic exploitation: the lexicon, morpho-syntax, prosody,
pragmatics, dialectology, sociolinguistics and interaction.


Anne Przewozny-Desriaux
Dpt des Etudes du Monde Anglophone
CLLE-ERSS | CNRS UMR 5263
Université Toulouse 2 Jean Jaurès
5 allées Antonio Machado
31058 TOULOUSE Cedex 9 France
+ 33 5 61 50 36 04
http://clle.univ-tlse2.fr/accueil/actualites/annuaire/mme-przewozny-desriaux-anne-29321.kjsp?RH=1458287939123

PAC 2017 and PAC programme available at http://www.projet-pac.net/
LVTI project at http://www.projet-pac.net/index.php/frfr

4th Learner Corpus Research Conference

4th Learner Corpus Research Conference

Bolzano/Bozen, 5-7 October 2017

2nd Call for Papers

Following the successful conferences in Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium) in 2011, Bergen (Norway) in 2013 and Nijmegen (the Netherlands) in 2015, the 4th Learner Corpus Research Conference will be hosted by the Institute for Specialised Communication and Multilingualism at EURAC Research, Bolzano/Bozen, Italy. The conference, organized under the aegis of the Learner Corpus Association, aims to be a showcase for the latest developments in the field and will feature full paper presentations, work in progress reports, poster presentations, software demos and a book exhibition.

The theme of LCR 2017 is “Widening the Scope of Learner Corpus Research”.

Conference Venue: European Academy Bozen/Bolzano – EURAC Research

Confirmed keynote speakers:

  • Philip Durrant (University of Exeter, United Kingdom)
  • Stefan Th. Gries (University of California, Santa Barbara, U.S.A.)
  • Stefania Spina (Università per Stranieri Perugia, Italy)

The keynote speakers will address the theme of LCR 2017 in their respective lectures on L1 writing development and Learner Corpus Research, quantitative methods in Learner Corpus Research, and Learner Corpus Research and Italian as L2. We welcome papers that address all aspects of Learner Corpus Research, in particular the following ones:

  • Corpora as pedagogical resources
  • Corpus-based transfer studies
  • Data mining and other explorative approaches to learner corpora
  • English as a Lingua Franca
  • Error detection and correction of learner language
  • Extracting language features from learner corpora
  • Innovative annotations in learner corpora
  • Language for academic/specific purposes
  • Learner varieties
  • Learner corpora for less commonly taught languages
  • Learner Corpus Research and the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR)
  • Learner Corpus Research and Natural Language Processing
  • Links between Learner Corpus Research and other research methodologies (e.g. experimental methods)
  • Search engines for learner corpora
  • Statistical methods in learner corpus studies
  • Task and learner variables

There will be four different categories of presentation:

  • Full paper (20 minutes + 10 minutes for discussion)
  • Work in Progress (WiP) report (10 minutes + 5 minutes for discussion)
  • Corpus/software demonstration
  • Poster

The Work in Progress reports and posters are intended to present research still at a preliminary stage and on which researchers would like to get feedback.

The language of the conference is English.

Abstracts

Your abstract should be between 600 and 700 words (excluding a list of references). Abstracts should provide the following:

  • clearly articulated research question(s) and its/their relevance;
  • the most important details about research approach, data and methods;
  • the main results and their interpretation.

Abstracts should be submitted through EasyChair (https://easychair.org/conferences/?conf=lcr2017) by Sunday 15 January 2017. Please follow instructions provided on the conference website (http://lcr2017.eurac.edu).

Please note: The Learner Corpus Association will award the best paper and the best poster presentation given by a PhD student. Only LCA members can participate in the competition. Members interested in entering the competition must indicate so when submitting their abstracts.

Abstracts will be reviewed anonymously by the scientific committee. Notification of the outcome of the review process will be sent by 31 March 2017.

 

LCR2017 – Preconference workshop in honour of Professor Sylviane Granger

“LCR at the interfaces”, 4 October 2017, 15.00 to 18.00

This workshop, organized by the Centre for English Corpus Linguistics (Université catholique de Louvain) in honour of Sylviane Granger, will feature a series of invited speakers whose work has greatly contributed to the development of LCR.

Four key interfaces will be discussed during the workshop:

-          “The interfaces between LCR and contrastive analysis” (Hilde Hasselgård and Signe Oksefjell Ebeling)

-          “The interfaces between LCR and SLA” (Nina Vyatkina)

-          “The interfaces between LCR and lexicography” (tbc)

-          “The interfaces between LCR and NLP” (tbc)

Join us for this event which promises to be a landmark in the LCR history!

 

The LCR 2017 organising committee

Andrea Abel (EURAC Research)
María Belén Díez-Bedmar (Universidad de Jaén)
Daniela Gasser (EURAC Research)
Aivars Glaznieks (EURAC Research)
Verena Lyding (EURAC Research)
Lionel Nicolas (EURAC Research)

The LCR 2017 scientific committee

Andrea Abel (EURAC Research)
Katherine Ackerley (Università degil Studi di Padova)
Annelie Ädel (Dalarna University)
Nicolas Ballier (Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7)
María Belén Díez-Bedmar (Universidad de Jaén)
Marcus Callies (Universität Bremen)
Erik Castello (Università degil Studi di Padova)
Francesca Coccetta (Università Ca’Foscari Venezia)
Pieter de Haan (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen)
Hilde Hasselgård (Universitet i Oslo)
Sandra Deshors (New Mexico State University)
Ana Diaz-Negrillo (Universidad de Granada)
Michael Flor (ETS)
John Flowerdew (City University of Hong Kong)
Lynne Flowerdew (independent researcher)
Fanny Forsberg Lundell (Stockholm University)
Gaëtanelle Gilquin (University of Louvain)
Sandra Götz (Justus Liebig Universität Gießen)
Solveig Granath (Karlstad University)
Sylviane Granger (Universtié catholique de Louvain)
Nicholas Groom (University of Birmingham)
Jirka Hana (Charles University Prague)
Shin’ichiro Ishikawa (Kobe University)
Jarmo Harri Jantunen (University of Jyväskylä)
Scott Jarvis (Ohio University)
Marie Källkvist (Lund University Sweden)
Agnieszka Lenko-Szymanska (University of Warsaw)
Cristóbal Jesús Lozano Pozo (Universidad de Granada)
Anke Lüdeling (Humboldt-Universität Berlin)
Carla Marello (Università degil Studi Torino)
Fanny Meunier (Universtié catholique de Louvain)
Detmar Meurers (Universität Tübingen)
Florence Myles (University of Essex)
Susan Nacey (Hedmark University College)
Lionel Nicolas (EURAC Research)
Michael O’Donnell (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid)
Signe Oksefjell Ebeling (Universitetet i Oslo)
Magali Paquot (Universtié catholique de Louvain/FNRS)
Pascual Pérez-Paredes (University of Cambridge)
Tom Rankin (Vienna University of Economics and Business)
Paul Rayson (UCREL, Lancaster University)
Ute Römer (University of Michigan)
Anna Siyanova-Chanturia (Victoria University of Wellington)
Jennifer Thewissen (Universiteit Antwerpen)
Yukio Tono (Tokyo University of Foreign Studies)
Nina Vyatkina (University of Kansas)
Heike Zinsmeister (Universität Hamburg)

Trinity Lancaster Corpus – early data grants

Dear All,
 
The ESRC Centre for Corpus Approaches to Social Science (CASS), Lancaster University and Trinity College London are pleased to announce the Trinity Lancaster Corpus Early Access Data Grant Scheme.
 
Applications are now open for researchers with an interest in spoken second language production and learner corpora to gain early access to a large subset of the Trinity Lancaster Corpus (TLC) of spoken L2 English and publish their findings (subject to peer-review) in a special issue of the International Journal of Learner Corpus Research or an edited volume published by a major publisher. The deadline for applications for the early access scheme is 20th January 2017.
 
More information about the data grants can be found on the CASS website http://cass.lancs.ac.uk/?page_id=2163 which also contains further links to the description of the corpus and the application form.